Supreme Court: Hearing on petitions against Sedition Law and Places of Worship Act 1991, know important dates

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Supreme Court.

Supreme Court.
Photo: ANI

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Nearly seven months after quashing the sedition law, the Supreme Court will hear on Wednesday petitions challenging the colonial-era punitive law. In a landmark order, the apex court had on May 11 last year decided to suspend the penal law for sedition. Along with this, the Supreme Court will also hear petitions challenging the validity of the 1991 law on religious places on Monday.

A bench of Chief Justice DY Chandrachud and Justice PS Narasimha listed 12 petitions, including one filed by the Editors Guild of India, against the Act for hearing on Wednesday.

Significantly, keeping this law on hold last year, a bench headed by the then CJI NV Ramana had ordered that apart from registering new FIRs, ongoing investigation in cases registered under this law, pending trial as well as sedition All proceedings under the law will remain suspended. The bench observed that “the harshness of section 124A (sedition) of the IPC is not commensurate with the present social environment”. Till such time the inquiry is not completed, it would be appropriate for the governments not to continue to use the aforesaid provision of law.

what in law
According to IPC 124A, if any person by words, speech, writing, gesture, visible sign or any other way excites disaffection or attempts to excite disaffection, disobedience or incitement among the public against the Government established by law produces or attempts to do so, be deemed to be sedition, shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to three years, or with imprisonment for life, and shall also be liable to fine.

Explanation of many words of law in IPC also

  • Resentment includes feelings of animosity and disloyalty.
  • It shall not be sedition to make offensive remarks which tend to excite hatred, disobedience or disaffection, or without such attempt to pervert the affairs of the Government by lawful means.
  • Those comments will also not be seditious, in which dislike is shown against the official and other works of the government but does not try to incite hatred, disobedience or disaffection.

Statements disturbing public order are considered treason

  • The Punjab High Court in 1951 and the Allahabad High Court in 1959 held Section 124A to be unconstitutional and stifling freedom of expression.
  • In 1962, the Supreme Court said in an order that statements made against the government or political parties are not illegal. But statements that disturb public order will come under the category of sedition.

By mistake the law could not be made for ten years

  • The history of sedition law is interesting. A 2018 Law Commission report states that Thomas Macaulay, the British officer who drafted the IPC in 1837, placed the sedition law in Section 113. But due to some mistake it could not be included in the IPC implemented in 1860. Section 124A was added to the IPC through Special Act 17 in 1870.
  • It was a copy of Britain’s ‘Sedition Act 1848′, in which punishments for the guilty ranged from three years’ imprisonment to forever being sent across the ocean.
Hearing will be held tomorrow in case of validity of Places of Worship (Special Provisions) Act 1991

Along with this, the Supreme Court will also hear petitions challenging the validity of the 1991 law on religious places on Monday. A bench of Chief Justice DY Chandrachud and Justice PS Narasimha listed six petitions, including one filed by former Rajya Sabha MP Subramanian Swamy, against the provisions of this law.

What is Place of Worship (Special Provisions) Act 1991
Significantly, the Places of Worship (Special Provisions) Act 1991 is an act, which prohibits the conversion of any place of worship from one faith to another religion and the maintenance of any monument on religious grounds, which came into existence till August 15, 1947. Is. This Central Act was passed on 18th September, 1991.

Expansion

Nearly seven months after quashing the sedition law, the Supreme Court will hear on Wednesday petitions challenging the colonial-era punitive law. In a landmark order, the apex court had on May 11 last year decided to suspend the penal law for sedition. Along with this, the Supreme Court will also hear petitions challenging the validity of the 1991 law on religious places on Monday.

A bench of Chief Justice DY Chandrachud and Justice PS Narasimha listed 12 petitions, including one filed by the Editors Guild of India, against the Act for hearing on Wednesday.

Significantly, keeping this law on hold last year, a bench headed by the then CJI NV Ramana had ordered that apart from registering new FIRs, ongoing investigation in cases registered under this law, pending trial as well as sedition All proceedings under the law will remain suspended. The bench observed that “the harshness of section 124A (sedition) of the IPC is not commensurate with the present social environment”. Till such time the inquiry is not completed, it would be appropriate for the governments not to continue to use the aforesaid provision of law.

what in law

According to IPC 124A, if any person by words, speech, writing, gesture, visible sign or any other way excites disaffection or attempts to excite disaffection, disobedience or incitement among the public against the Government established by law produces or attempts to do so, be deemed to be sedition, shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to three years, or with imprisonment for life, and shall also be liable to fine.

Explanation of many words of law in IPC also

  • Resentment includes feelings of animosity and disloyalty.
  • It shall not be sedition to make offensive remarks which tend to excite hatred, disobedience or disaffection, or without such attempt to pervert the affairs of the Government by lawful means.
  • Those comments will also not be seditious, in which dislike is shown against the official and other works of the government but does not try to incite hatred, disobedience or disaffection.


Statements disturbing public order are considered treason

  • The Punjab High Court in 1951 and the Allahabad High Court in 1959 held Section 124A to be unconstitutional and stifling freedom of expression.
  • In 1962, the Supreme Court said in an order that statements made against the government or political parties are not illegal. But statements that disturb public order will come under the category of sedition.


By mistake the law could not be made for ten years

  • The history of sedition law is interesting. A 2018 Law Commission report states that Thomas Macaulay, the British officer who drafted the IPC in 1837, placed the sedition law in Section 113. But due to some mistake it could not be included in the IPC implemented in 1860. Section 124A was added to the IPC through Special Act 17 in 1870.
  • It was a copy of Britain’s ‘Sedition Act 1848′, in which punishments for the guilty ranged from three years’ imprisonment to forever being sent across the ocean.